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101 1 barn. Familie F2612
 
102 1 datter. FLEISCHER, Johanne Cathrine (I5645)
 
103 1 sønn og 1 datter. FLEISCHER, Ingrid (I5580)
 
104 1. Amund SOELBERG tolder. Død 24. april 1727 i Drammen. Begr. 1. maj i Strømsø
~ ca. 1709 med Inger Catharina LACHMANN (1683-1756). . · Sandsynligvis ældste søn af ovenstående Joen Amundsen Soelberg, nok født omkring 1666-70 (kirkebøgerne For Bragernes/Drammen er først bevaret fra 1680). Tjente fra ca. 1685 i Zahlkammeret og Proviantgården i København under slotsfoged Claus Hartvigsen. Fuldmægtig sammested ca.1692. 7 maj 1707 vendte han tilbage til fødeegnen og blev tolder, købmand og tømmerhandler i Drammen. Han giftede sig kort efter tiltrædelsen (formodentlig omkring 1709) med forgængeren Jens Rasmussens Brønstorphs enke. 1720 hører han til de største skatteydere i Drammen. Han druknede ved toldboden i Drammen.
Hans kone var søster til laugmand over Hedemarken Andreas Lachmann [13] <3_0.php>.
 
SOLBERG, Amund (I13534)
 
105 1. earl of Leicester. DE BEAUMONT, Robert (I13953)
 
106 1. earl of Moray and prior of St. Andrews. Advisor and rival to his half-sister, Mary, Queen of Scots and regent for his nephew, James VI.

James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the illegitimate son of James IV, see James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (1501 creation).James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray
Regent of Scotland

The Earl of Moray, a detail from a wedding portrait by Hans Eworth
Born c. 1531
Scotland
Died 23 January 1570
Linlithgow, Scotland
Cause of death Assassination by a firearm
Religion Church of Scotland
Spouse(s) Agnes Keith
Children Elizabeth Stewart, 2nd Countess of Moray
Annabel Stewart
Margaret Stewart
Parents King James V of Scotland
Lady Margaret Erskine


James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (c. 1531 – 23 January 1570)[1] a member of the House of Stewart as the illegitimate son of King James V, was Regent of Scotland for his nephew, the infant King James VI of Scotland, from 1567 until his assassination in 1570. Until 1562 he was known as Lord James, his title was Lord Abernethy.Contents [hide]
1 Life and career
2 The Good Regent
2.1 York conference
2.2 Military activities
3 Family
4 Assassination
5 Moray in popular culture
6 References

Life and career[edit]

Moray was born in about 1531, the most notable of the many illegitimate children of King James V of Scotland. His mother was the King's favourite mistress, Lady Margaret Erskine, daughter of John Erskine, 5th Lord Erskine, and wife of Sir Robert Douglas of Lochleven. On 31 August 1536 he had a charter of the lands of Tantallon and others. James was appointed Prior of St Andrews, Fife, in his youth in 1538.[2] This position supplied his income. As early as May 1553, the imperial ambassador to England, Jean Scheyfve, heard that Mary of Guise planned to make him Regent of Scotland in place of James Hamilton, Duke of Châtellerault.[3]

On 5 August 1557, Moray, his half-brother Lord Robert, and Lord Home led a raiding party from Edinburgh towards Ford Castle in Northumbria and burnt houses at Fenton before retreating on the approach of an English force led by Henry Percy.[4] James attended the wedding of his legitimate half-sister, Mary, Queen of Scots, in Paris. To fund this trip his mother obtained credit from Timothy Cagnioli, an Italian banker in Edinburgh.[5]

James became a supporter of the Scottish Reformation. At Perth in June 1559 he plucked down the images in various churches.[6] An English commentator praised James for his virtue, manhood, valiantness and stoutness as a leader of the Protestant Lords of the Congregation.[7]

Despite their religious differences, Moray became the chief advisor to his sister, Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1561 after her return from France. She was the only surviving child of his father's marriage to Mary of Guise. Although James disturbed her priests celebrating mass at Holyroodhouse in September 1561,[8] she made him Earl of Moray and Earl of Mar the following year.[9] With the earldom came Darnaway Castle with its medieval hall, notable even then as "verie fayer and large builded." Moray also had a smaller house called Pitlethie near Leuchars in Fife, which his father had used.[10]

In October 1562, he defeated a rebellion by George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly, at the Battle of Corrichie near Aberdeen. Moray opposed the marriage of Mary, Queen of Scots, to Lord Darnley in 1565, and he embarked upon the unsuccessful Chaseabout Raid, together with the Earl of Argyll and Clan Hamilton. He was subsequently declared an outlaw and took refuge in England. Returning to Scotland after the murder of David Rizzio, he was pardoned by the Queen. He contrived, however, to be away at the time of Darnley's assassination, and avoided the tangles of the marriage with Bothwell by going to France.
The Good Regent[edit]

Mary abdicated at Loch Leven Castle on 24 July 1567. Moray returned to Edinburgh from France on 11 August 1567, escorted from Berwick-upon-Tweed by James Melville of Halhill, with a French ambassador, De Lignerolles. William Cecil, the English secretary of State had arranged his transport from Dieppe in an English ship.[11] He was appointed Regent of Scotland on 22 August.[12]

The appointment was confirmed by Parliament in December. When Mary escaped from Loch Leven on 2 May 1568 the Duke of Chatelherault and other nobles rallied to her standard, but Moray gathered his allies and defeated her forces at the Battle of Langside, near Glasgow on 13 May 1568. Mary was compelled to flee to England. For this and the subsequent management of the kingdom he secured both civil and ecclesiastical peace, and earned the title of "The Good Regent".
York conference[edit]

In September 1568, Moray choose commissioners and went to York to discuss a treaty with England. During this conference he produced the casket letters which were supposed to incriminate Queen Mary, and justify his rule in Scotland. It was later said that a plan to assassinate him at North Allerton on his way back had been called off.[13]
Military activities[edit]

Scotland was now in a state of civil war. Moray moved against the supporters of Queen Mary in their south-west homelands with a military expedition in June 1568 called the 'Raid of Dumfries' or 'Raid of Hoddom.' The Regent's army and the royal artillery was taken to Biggar, where his allies were commanded to muster on 10 June, and on to Dumfries. The army was protected by a scouting party led by Alexander Hume of Manderston, the vanguard was commanded by the Earl of Morton and Lord Hume. Behind was the 'carriage', the artillery train, followed by Moray himself. The Laird of Cessford followed behind, and the army was flanked by the scouting parties of the Lairds of Merse and Buccleuch.

Along the way Moray captured houses belonging to supporters of Queen Mary, including Lord Fleming's Boghall, Skirling, Crawford, Sanquhar, Kenmuir, and Hoddom where the cannon were deployed, and Annan where he rendezvoused with Lord Scrope the Captain of Carlisle Castle to discuss border matters. Scrope estimated the army to number 6,000 men, and returned to Carlisle where he saw Queen Mary's servants play football on 14 June. Moray then took Lochmaben Castle, which the Laird of Drumlanrig was left to hold, and then captured Lochwood and Lochhouse before returning to Edinburgh via Peebles. At Dumfries, a number of Lord Maxwell's supporters surrendered.[14] Moray was responsible for the destruction of Rutherglen castle, which he burned to the ground in 1569 in retribution against the Hamiltons for having supported Mary at the Battle of Langside.

In June 1569 Moray went north to Brechin where he accepted hostages sent by the Earl of Huntley, then at Dunnotar Castle he proclaimed that he had, "reparit (arrived) in proper person (as Regent) to thir north partis of firm purpose and deliberation to reduce sic as hes neglectit their duty in time bypast ..., intending to use lenitie (leniency) and moderation."[15]

At Aberdeen he held talks with Huntly himself. At Inverness, on 4 June 1569, Moray met the Highland and Island chiefs with the Earls of Caithness and Sutherland and Lord Lovat . His secretary, John Wood, said "such a power had seldom been seen there," Moray wrote that "the journey is to put down troubles in the north."[16]
Family[edit]

Agnes, Countess of Moray by Hans Eworth

On 8 February 1561/2 at Holyrood,[17] Moray married Agnes Keith, daughter of William Keith, 4th Earl Marischal. The marriage produced three daughters:[18]
Elizabeth Stuart, 2nd Countess of Moray (? - 18 November 1591), married between 23 January 1580 and 1581 James Stewart, 2nd Earl of Moray
Lady Annabel Stuart (? - before 1572)
Lady Margaret Stuart (? - 1586), contract for the marriage signed on 27 June 1584 with Francis Hay, 9th Earl of Erroll, without issue.[19]
Assassination[edit]

Assassination of the Regent Moray. Victorian stained glass window in St. Giles Kirk, Edinburgh.

On Thursday 19 January 1570 Moray was at Stirling Castle where he had invited the English diplomat Sir Henry Gate, Marshal of Berwick, and the soldier Sir William Drury for dinner in the Great Hall. Later in his bedchamber he told the English visitors he would meet with them and certain Scottish nobles at Edinburgh on Monday or Tuesday to discuss the rendition of English rebels. Moray was troubled by the problem of Dumbarton Castle, which was held against him by supporters of Mary, Queen of Scots.[20] On 21 January, he sent letters to summon Morton, Lindsay and Home to the meeting in Edinburgh.[21]

Moray was assassinated in Linlithgow on 23 January 1570 by James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh, a supporter of Mary. As Moray was passing in a cavalcade in the main street below, Hamilton fatally wounded him with a carbine shot from a window of his uncle Archbishop Hamilton's house.[22] It was the first recorded assassination by a firearm.[23]

The Regent's body was shipped to Leith then taken to Holyrood Abbey.[24] Moray was buried on 14 February 1570 in St. Anthony's aisle at St. Giles, Edinburgh. Seven earls and lords carried his body; William Kirkcaldy of Grange held his standard, and John Knox preached at the funeral.[25] Knox's own prohibition of funeral sermons (on the grounds that they glorified the deceased and displayed distinctions between rich and poor) was waived for the occasion.[26] Moray's tomb was carved by John Roytell and Murdoch Walker, with a brass engraved by James Gray.[27] His wife, Agnes Keith, was buried inside his tomb when she died in 1588.[28] Moray was succeeded by his eldest daughter and heir, Elizabeth Stewart, 2nd Countess of Moray, whose husband, James Stewart of Doune acquired the earldom on their marriage.
Moray in popular culture[edit]

Notable media depictions of Moray include Patrick McGoohan's portrayal of James Stewart (pre-Regency) in the 1971 film Mary, Queen of Scots. He also features in Sir Walter Scott's 1820 novel The Monastery.

References[edit]
Jump up ^ Spottiswoode, John, History of the Church in Scotland, vol. 2,
Oliver & Boyd (1851), 120 gives date in Old Style as Saturday 23 January 1569/70, although Saturday was 21 January in that year, see Reference calendar: Loughlin, Mark, 'Stewart, James, first earl of Moray (1531/2–1570)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 24 Jan 2011 accepts 23 January: Fraser, Antonia, Mary, Queen of Scots, p. 486 (p. 421 English edition) has 11 January 1570 as date of the assassination. Also mentioned by Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 242.
Jump up ^ Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on
Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume I, page 23.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Spanish, vol. xi, (1916), 41–2.
Jump up ^ Strype, John, Ecclesiastical Memorials, vol. 3 part 2, (1822),
67–9.
Jump up ^ Cameron, Annie I., ed., Scottish Correspondence of Mary of
Lorraine, (1927), 411, total £1687-10s Scots.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 216.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 362,
Randolph to Killigrew, 15 April 1560.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 555.
Jump up ^ Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy
(London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 242.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 655: vol. 2
(1900), 2: Graves, Andrea, Princlie Majestie', John Donald (2005), 52
Jump up ^ Stevenson, Joseph, ed., Selections from Unpublished
Manuscripts, Maitland Club (1837), pp.200-1, 269-271: Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol.2 (1900), pp.380-1 no.595
Jump up ^ Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on
Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume I, page 23.
Jump up ^ Murdin, William, ed., Collection of State Papers, London
(1759), p.51.
Jump up ^ Accounts of the Treasurer of Scotland, vol.12 (1970), 128-134:
Holinshed, Raphael, Chronicles: Scotland, vol.5, London (1808), 634: Bannatyne Miscellany, vol.1, Edinburgh (1827), Jump up ^ Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on
Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume I, page 23.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Spanish, vol. xi, (1916), 41–2.
Jump up ^ Strype, John, Ecclesiastical Memorials, vol. 3 part 2, (1822),
67–9.
Jump up ^ Cameron, Annie I., ed., Scottish Correspondence of Mary of
Lorraine, (1927), 411, total £1687-10s Scots.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 216.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 362,
Randolph to Killigrew, 15 April 1560.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 555.
Jump up ^ Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy
(London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 242.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (1898), 655: vol. 2
(1900), 2: Graves, Andrea, Princlie Majestie', John Donald (2005), 52
Jump up ^ Stevenson, Joseph, ed., Selections from Unpublished
Manuscripts, Maitland Club (1837), pp.200-1, 269-271: Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol.2 (1900), pp.380-1 no.595
Jump up ^ Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on
Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume I, page 23.
Jump up ^ Murdin, William, ed., Collection of State Papers, London
(1759), p.51.
Jump up ^ Accounts of the Treasurer of Scotland, vol.12 (1970), 128-134:
Holinshed, Raphael, Chronicles: Scotland, vol.5, London (1808), 634: Bannatyne Miscellany, vol.1, Edinburgh (1827), 23-29, 'Progress of the Regent of Scotland', from a manuscript now in the National Library of Scotland: CSP. Scotland, vol.2 (1900), nos. 700, 703, 716, 717.
Jump up ^ Register Privy Council Scotland, vol.1 (1879), p.666-8,
proclamation at Dunnotar
Jump up ^ CSP Scotland, vol.2 (1900), p.652 no.1072; p.653 no.1075
Jump up ^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H.
White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 183.
Jump up ^ Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage &
Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1336.
Jump up ^ Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage &
Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1336.
Jump up ^ Calendar of State Papers Scotland, vol. 3, (1903), 55–6, Gate
and Drury to Lord Hunsdon, Linlithgow, 20 January 1570.
Jump up ^ Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, vol. 12,
HMSO (1970), 187.
Jump up ^ Antonia Fraser, Mary, Queen of Scots, pp. 339, 486
Jump up ^ James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray,Undiscovered Scotland,
retrieved on 27 March 2009.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 3 (1903), 84.
Jump up ^ Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 3 (1903), 84.
Jump up ^ Jasper Ridley, John Knox, OUP 1968, p.488
Jump up ^ HMC 6th Report, Moray Manuscripts 646: Laing, David (1864–
6), "Monument to the Regent Earl of Murray" (PDF), Proceedings Society Antiquaries Scotland (PSAS) 6, pp. 49–55
Jump up ^ Millar, Peter (1884-5) [1882], "Earl of Moray's Tomb in St Giles:
Extracts,... Burgh Records of Edinburgh 1573–1589, Scottish Burgh Records Society" (PDF), PSAS 19, pp. 210–12, 525.
This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University PressGovernment offices
Preceded by
none Regent of Scotland
1567–1570 Succeeded by
Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
New Creation Earl of Moray
1562–1570 Succeeded by
Elizabeth Stewart 
STEWART, James (I14055)
 
107 1. earl of Pembroke. MARSHAL, William (I13930)
 
108 1. lord of Annandale.

Robert de Brus, 1st Lord of Annandale
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Robert I de Brus, 1st Lord of Annandale (c.?1078 – 1141/1142) was an early 12th century Norman baron and knight, the first of the Bruce dynasty of Scotland and England. A monastic patron, he is remembered as the founder of Gisborough Priory in Yorkshire, in present day Redcar and Cleveland, in 1119.[1]Contents [hide]
1 Biography
2 Marriage
3 Footnotes
4 References

Biography[edit]

Nothing is known of Robert's father, except that he was a landowner in Normandy.[2] An early modern historiographical tradition that he was the son of a Norman noble named Robert I le Brus or de Brus who came to England with William the Conqueror in 1066 and died ca. 1094 has been found to be without basis.[2]

Modern historians contend that Robert may have come from Brix, Manche, near Cherbourg in the Cotentin Peninsula, and came to Britain after King Henry I of England's conquest of Normandy (i.e.: at the same time as Alan fitz Flaad, ancestor of the Stuart Royal Family). David fitz Malcolm (after 1124 King David I of Scotland), was present in France with King Henry and was granted much of the Cotentin Peninsula. It is suggested that Robert de Brus's presences and absences at Henry's court coincide with David's.

Robert de Brus went to Scotland, where the new King, David, made him Lord of Annandale in 1124,[3] although there is scant evidence that this Robert took up residence on his Scottish estates.

After the death of King Henry, David turned against Henry's successor, King Stephen. As a result Robert de Brus and King David parted company, with Robert bitterly renouncing his homage to David before taking the English side at the Battle of the Standard.[4]
Marriage[edit]

Robert is said to have married twice: (1) Agnes, daughter of Geoffrey Bainard, Sheriff of York and (2) Agnes, daughter and heiress of Fulk de Pagnall, Lord of Carleton, North Yorkshire[5][6]

There were two sons, but it is unclear by which spouse:
Robert de Brus, 2nd Lord of Annandale, who inherited the Lordship of Annandale.
Adam de Brus, Lord of Skelton, whose descendants held lands in England as Lords of Skelton, until extinction 1271.
Footnotes[edit]
Jump up ^ Sherlock, Stephen. "Gisborough Priory: Information for Teachers" English Heritage. 2001. 1 Oct 2008.
^ Jump up to: a b Duncan, ODNB
Jump up ^ Donaldson, Gordon, Scottish Historical Documents, Edinburgh, 1970, ISBN 7011-1604-8 :19, "David by the grace of God King of Scots, to all his barons, men, and friends, French and English,
greeting. Know ye that I have given and granted to Robert de Brus Estrahanent (i.e: Annandale) and all the land from the boundary of Randolph Meschin; and I will and grant that he should hold and have that land and its castle well and honourably with all its customs," &c. This is a new charter and not a reconfirmation.
Jump up ^ Burton, John Hill, The History of Scotland, New revised edition, Edinburgh, 1876, vol.1, p.437
Jump up ^ Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford, 1904 (online version available Duncan, ODNB
Jump up ^ Burke (1883) p.80
References[edit]
Duncan, A.A.M., 'de Brus, Robert (I), Lord of Annandale (d. 1142)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/3748. Retrieved 28 October 2008.
Oram, Richard, David: The King Who Made Scotland, (Gloucestershire, 2004)Robert de Brus, 1st Lord of Annandale
House of Bruce
Born: c.?1078 Died: 1142
Preceded by
New Creation Lord of Annandale
1113 x 1124-1138 Succeeded by
Robert II de Brus 
DE BRUS, Robert (I13948)
 
109 10 barn. FLEISCHER, Marie Magdalene Elisabeth (I5260)
 
110 10 barn. D'AUBIGNY, Isabel (I19215)
 
111 10 år ved farens skifte 1701.

Vielsen skal være nevnt i Personalhistorisk tidsskrift 1958 s. 82 ff, note 7. 
BRØNSDORPH, Kirstine Marie Rasmusdtr (I15024)
 
112 10.10.1650 borgermester i Bergen. 14.09.1652 lagmann i Gulating lagdømme. 29.12.1665 utnevnes til kongelig commissarius og assessor i "høieste ret". 20.02.1667 Kongelig konfirmasjon på den ham av Gyldenløve meddelte bestalling som assessor i Overhofretten i Norge. 09.06.1669 entlediget som amtsforvalter i Bergen, som han da hadde vært i 2 år, ble samtidig fritatt for å møte i Overhofretten, men med bibehold av rang og sete. 26.05.1676 fikk adelspatent.

Se: Personalhistorisk tidsskrift 1. r. b. 2 s. 224, bd. 6 s. 1ff. Lexicon over adelige familier I s. 331. Holms samlinger til et dansk-norsk adelslexicon. 
LILLIENSKJOLD, Hans Hansen Smith (I3228)
 
113 11. av Dundas. DUNDAS, James (I14816)
 
114 11.04.1759 premierløytnant i jyllandske nationale infanteri regiment
19.09.1764 overført til dronningens livregiment
13.10.1779 kaptein i infanteriet
1782 stabskaptein
11.02.1785 avskjed med 150 rdl. pensjon (Hirsch)
20.05.1808 nevnes i testament etter broren Nicolay Schwartz Geelmuyden som kaptein, boende i Glückstadt 
GEELMUYDEN, Christopher Fredrik (I347)
 
115 12 Aug 1770 Bakermester i Bergen. STUWITZ, Andreas Christopher (I4708)
 
116 12 barn. FLEISCHER, Agnethe Cathrine (I5273)
 
117 12.05.1761 trolovet i Sæbø sogn.

Hun var langfredag 1791 fadder for Johanes Johanesen og Ane Nilsdtr. Olsvolds sønn Knud.

Ved skiftet etter faren 24.05.1758 ble brødrene ansett som hennes formyndere.

Hun flyttet til Olsvold.

Hun døde som enke.

Se: Folketelling 1801, Manger prestegjeld, Olsvoll Kirkebok for Manger nr. 1 1759-1791 f. 17 (12.05.1761), f. 18 (21.06-1761), f. 35 (14.07.1763), f. 53 (30.11.1765), f. 71 (11.08.1768), f. 77b (08.10.1769), f. 95 (04.10.1772), f. 112b (08.10.1775 og 03.10.1775), f. 232 (langfredag 1791). 
LUNDE, Lisbeth Østensdtr. (I2762)
 
118 13 år i folketellingen 1801. LINDE, Margrete (I14947)
 
119 13 år ved foreldrenes samfrende skifte i april 1759.
Konfirmert 1761, 15 år gammel i Værslev (innført på kirkebokens nest siste tekstside, AO oppslag 100).

Hans Peter kvitterte 3. januar 1773 for mottatt morsarv 500 rdl og renter.

Bosted 1766 Vesterbygaard hovedgård, Jorløse sogn, Skippinge herred, Holbæk amt. 
BRØNSTORPH, Hans Peter (I13473)
 
120 13.08.1747 sekondløytnant i 1. Trondhjemske regiment
04.02.1750 premierløytnant
11.03.1761 karakt. kaptein
01.01.1766 sjef for Overhaldenske kompani
21.10.1774 major Oberst

Se: W. Lassen: Wibe og Lund Joh. Sommerschield: Stamtavle over familien Sommerschield (Namsos 1908) s. 5 
SOMMERSCHILD, Henrik Christoffer (I1271)
 
121 13.08.1795 borgerskap, bakermester.
Ved vielsen 1797 kalt ungkar og mester baker.

Folketelling 1801, Bergen 15. rode nr. 5
Andreas Christopher Stuwitz, 32 år, bakermester, i 1. ekteskap
Lydia Fasting Geelmuyden, 28 år, hustru, i 1. ekteskap
Barn:
Elisabeth von Recken Stuwitz, 4 år
Gerhardine Catrine Stuwitz, 2 år
Andreas Christopher Stuwitz, 1 år
Han har i 1801 tre svenner, 5 læredrenger, en tjenestedreng og 4 tjenestepiker boende hos seg.

Også i 1806 og 1810 bodde han i 15. rode nr. 5. Digitalarkivets register for døpte i Bergen påstår ved sønnens dåp 1811 at han bodde i 15. rode nr. 6, men det stemmer dårlig med at han i 1817 bor i 15. rode nr. 5.

11 barn.

På Domkirken kirkegård finnes en liggende jernplate med følgende gravskrift:
Bagermester
Andreas
Christopher
Stuwitz
fød
i
Bergen d: 14 Martz 1769
død
Samesteds
den 20 May 1845
________
Agtet og elsket sin kreds.
Satte
hans etterladte ham
dette minde 
STUWITZ, Andreas Christopher (I1018)
 
122 13.10.1797 på Ulvatn 3 år, formynder farfaren Ole Larsen Olsvold tilsted. OLSVOLD, Ole Østensen (I9991)
 
123 13.10.1797 på Ulvatn 7 år, formynder Gudmund And. Ulvatten, tilstede. OLSVOLD, Anne Østensdtr. (I9992)
 
124 13.10.1797 på Ulvatn 2 år, verge var faren Østen Olsen Ulvatten, tilstede. OLSVOLD, Lisbet Østensdtr. (I9993)
 
125 13.11.1751 løytnant.
1760-tallet kaptein
major
bataljonsjef i 1. Bergenhusiske infanteriregiment.

Viet etter kongelig bevilling 25. februar 1772 (litteratur påstår 1762). Han kalles ved vielsen kaptein Henrich Paludan (kb. Os A9 1766-1779 f. 67a).

Jan har 5 barn i sitt andre ekteskap. 
PALUDAN, Jan Henrich Von (I1372)
 
126 1322 ridder.
1328 riksråd. 
GRUBBE TIL STORTHE, Peter (I10283)
 
127 1328 kalt Domicellus Barnum Eriksen (I10280)
 
128 1392 til Solbjerg og Allinde.
1395 Lensmann på Brorup. 
BILLE, Bernt Jonsen (I10245)
 
129 14 barn.

Det finnes maleriportretter av både henne og ektemannen.

Direktør Christian Ringnes har skrevet en egen slektsbok over hennes etterkommere, utgitt 1988. 
MAARTMANN, Karen Antonette ("Kaja", "Tonette") (I12604)
 
130 1413-1422. TUDOR, Henry V (I14069)
 
131 1480 ältermann i Bodense. NIELSEN, Erich (I3176)
 
132 15.06.1862 bodde i 11. rode nr. 216.

Se: Stamtavle over familien Angell (Bergen museum, manuskript nr. 771). 
ANGELL, Abel Helene Petersdtr. (I1302)
 
133 15/7 ca. 1953.
Kirsten er lærer på Sem skole i Vestfold (ungdomsskole). Bor i Tønsberg. 
SÆTHERN, Kirsten (I10062)
 
134 1537 prest i Norderhov. 1542 (?) sogneprest i Gran, hvor han var i 39 år frem til 1573.

Kannik i Hamar.

Han kom hjem igjen fra Tyskland i Hamarbispen Magnus Lauritssøns tid.

Han hadde 7 barn med sin "rådskvinne" Kirstine Olsdtr.

Død ca. 1573 ?

Se: Norsk tidsskrift for genealogi. Ludvig Daae: Norske bygdesagn I s. 32. Bugge: Våre forfedre. 
ELLINGSEN, Amund (I2286)
 
135 1540 militær i Leeuwarden, Nederland. GELMUDEN, Jacob van (I11713)
 
136 1554 borgermester i Veile.

Se: C. W. Ludv. Horn: Mindeblade om dem, fra hvem jeg stammer. s. 20. M. Bugge: Våre forfedre. s. 176. 
SØRENSEN, Klemmen (I3184)
 
137 1562 bodde i Fester i Faarbæk i Klim i Danmark. Faarbæk var et selveierbol før 1536. THOMSEN, Jens (I2654)
 
138 1565 rådmann i Horsens. ca. 1584 borgermester i Horsens.

Død av vatersot.

Se: Personalhistorisk tidsskrift 8 r. I s. 178. Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 175. C. W. Ludv. Horn: Mindeblade om dem, fra hvem jeg stammer s. 21. I. Wahl: Slægtebog over afkommet af Christjern Nielsen 2 s. 1. 
JØRGENSEN, Ole (I3182)
 
139 1577-1582 sogneprest i Kvinnherad
04.04.1582 kannik og sogneprest i Domkirken, prost over Nordhordland

1592 innstevnet han en mann til lagretten i Bergen, i forbindelse med at han 1581 hadde lånt penger av faren.

I en sak i rådhusprotokollen (som dekker juli 1592-mai 1594, folio 39b-49a) nevnes han 1593 som Trugels Lauritzen, kannik og sogneprest til Domkirken, sønn av vellærde Laurits Nilssøn Krog. (SAB, Bergen rådhusprotokoll 1592-1594 folio 45b-49a.)

Hans siste dager omtales slik: En søndag morgen kl. 4 mens han alene på sitt kammer arbeidet med prekenen som skulle holdes samme dag, hører han en røst som tre ganger kaller ham ved navn. Ettersom han følte at det ikke var noe menneskes røst, svarte han straks: "Tal herre, din tjener hører." Hvorpå røsten sa: "Fårene er borte og hyrden skal med." Dertil svarte han: "Ja, herre, jeg er beredt." Går straks så ned og vekker sin hustru og eneste datter, og sier dem at han vil de skal stå opp og gjøre seg klar til å gå til alters samme dag. Konen, som ikke tenkte på noe, unnskyldte seg og ba om at det måtte utsettes til en dag i uken. Men han ba henne la det bli som han hadde sagt, hvorpå hun og datteren sto opp og gjorde seg klar. Der etter går han til kirken og forretter tjenesten. Etter den ordinære tjenesten på prekestolen, begynte han en annen valetpreken og å takke av hos samtlige sine tilhørere. Siden gikk han til lensherren og øvrigheten og ga dem hånd med takksigelse og ba dem følge hans lik. Så gikk han til alters, og neste søndag deretter ble han båret død til kirken og begravet.

Hans skal være død "105 år gammel".
Han skal være omtalt av sønnen i et vitneutsagn i Domkapitlet:
Se der for bedre beregning av alderen !


Se:
A. Chr. Bang: Den norske geistlighed i reformasjonsårhundredet 1536-1600 s. 168-169
Norske magasin I s. 509, II s. 613 ff.
Bergens eldste justisprotokoll
Norske samlinger Ic, II s. 63ff, I s. 656
Norske stiftelser I s. 15
Personalhistorisk tidsskrift IV s. 222
Riksregistranter III s. 637
Kirkehistoriske samling III r. bd. I s. 564 ff 
KROG, Truels Lauritzen (I2048)
 
140 1586 fikk hun brev på at hun og sønnen Hieronimus skulle få beholde Arnold de Fines vikariat i De hellige tre kongers kapell.

1587 hadde 8 av de kongelige sangguttene opphold hos henne, Arnoldi sangmesters hustru, og det ble betalt 25 daler måneden for dem.

Se: L. H. F. de Fine Olivarius: Stamtavler over slægterne Olivarius og de Fine. E. C. Werlauff: Hellig 3 kongers capel, s. 72. 
KNOPF, Barbara Hieronymusdtr. (I2536)
 
141 1589 residerende kapellan til Hamarøy "Biskop Gunnerus's protokol" opplyser følgende: "Gamle breve melder, at han var prest i Hammerøen 1589".

24.07.1595 kongebrev på 30 daler årlig av Lødingens kirketiende. Dette beneficium mistet han 30.03.1605.

1599 sogneprest til Stegen, hvor han var til 1613

Se: Finne-Grønn: Legatslekten Broch A. Erlandsen: Biografiske efterretninger om geistligheden i Tromsø stift. A. Chr. Bang: Den norske kirkes geistlighed i reformasjonsårhundredet 1536-1600 s. 339. Rigsregistranter III s. 388, IV s. 104. 
BROCH, Abel Michelsen (I1768)
 
142 1597 byskriver i Bergen.

Se: Lorens Berg: Tjølling s. 192 
LEM, Peder (I2223)
 
143 16 Nov 1828 Hun var ugift da hun fikk en datter utenfor ekteskap, adresse 24. rode nr. 52, Bergen. JOHANISDTR, Agothe (I10399)
 
144 16.07.1700 deponert fra Bergen skole 1708 personell kapellan til Førde 09.10.1709 fikk attestats (non cont.) 03.03.1728 sogneprest til Norddalen

Den første kirkeboken 1720-1727 for Førde inneholder regnskaper fra Norddalen. Den må være medbrakt dit av Samuel Finde som måvære den somhar ført kirkeboken og derfor ansett den som sin private ? Kontrolleres ! 
FINDE, Samuel Henriksen (I2155)
 
145 1601 fogd i Nordfjord. 10.01.1626 til 21.06.1636 rådmann i Bergen. 165.. Stiftsskriver.

Stor gård- og skogseier, sagbruk, hvalfanger (NordNorge), sjøboder og skuter i Bergen. 
WITTRUP, Christen Søfrensen (I2250)
 
146 1603 rektor ved skolen i Svendborg
1604-1607 kapellan i Svendborg
1607 reiste utenlands
15.10.1610 magister
Januar 1611 sogneprest i Vejle
1612 prost i Vejle
1613 sogneprest til Albani kirke i Odense
1614 sogneprest til Nikolai kirke i København
1616 kongelig slotts- og hoffpredikant
1620 dr. theol Biskop i Lund
1628 nøt sine innkomster uhindret av fienden.
19.06.1633 forteller Ole Worm at han snart skal møte for herredagen.
15.05.1637 forteller Ole Worm at han ligger dødssyk
21.06.1637 forteller Ole Worm at han er død (Det betyr at den dødsdato som er funnet i literaturen, 14 mai 1638, må være feil).

Hans levnedsløp ble behandlet av Steffen Hansen Stephanius i "Lunds bispekrønike" som kom ut noen år etter hans død.

Se: W. Lassen: Wibe og Lund Ole Worm: Breve 
MEDELFARS, Mats Jenssøn (I2427)
 
147 1619 i Bergen. SURBECH, Jochum (I3289)
 
148 1619-1622 gikk på den tyske skole i Bergen. 23.02.1632 dimittert fra Bergens latinskole. Studerte siden ved Københavns og Rostocks universiteter 20.05.1634 Baccalaureus 17.11.1633 tredielektie i Bergen 01.08.1635 conrektor i Bergen 10.04.1637 sogneprest til Sogndal 27.06.1659 prost til Sogndal

Skifte 24 oktober 1668:
27.10. - 29.10. ?

Se: Lampe-Thrap: Bergen stifts biskoper og prester, bd. 2 s. 44 Norske magasin II p. 629 og 633 Slekten Heiberg (1907) s. 25, s. 20f, s. 23 Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 181 Laberg: Hafslo-boken s. 74, 262, 587 
HANNING, Peder Olufsen (I2111)
 
149 1625 prest i Bergen. 1627 sogneprest i Eid. 1650 prost. BUGGE, Samuel Hansen (I3336)
 
150 1629 SCHRØDER, Jesper Thevisen (I3318)
 

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