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1

9 barn, 9 barnebarn 
FLEISCHER, Jens Christian Poul (I5437)
 
2

In 1612 about ½ Habblesthorpe was owned by Michael Bland wh
o was sought out in August 1626 by an emissary of the Privy Council because he was suspected of growing tobacco in Utterby in the Lincolnshire marshland. Bland was not at home because he was being pursued by creditors and dared not show his face. The royal messenger judged him to be very poor and so fearful that he had to live away from home, leaving his wife and children alone at Utterby. His crop of tobacco intended for medicinal purposes occupied only 1/10th of an acre. [PRO SP 16/34 no 40]

A Richard Bland of Habblesthorp (probably their son) was a treasurer of the county of Lincs in 1627 (i.e. a gent or esq) 
Familie F15716
 
3
"I give to George Somerschalles my son the house that I dwe
ll upon, with all such appurtenances thereto belonging, of the yearly rent of 4s.

"And if the said George will not be ordered when he shall come to lawful age, and then to be good and fruitful to his mother and to follow her fancies in all her doings, then I will that the said George shall have his portion of my goods at the discretion of my wife and my recorders

George was the brother of Thomas of Stockdale and Richard the clerk (vicar). He was born late in the life of his father Robert and we know from his father's will that he was underage when he died in 1553. George did not leave a will, his son Robert (died 1597) was looking after him at that time and left him well provided for.

George did inherit one (or perhaps 2) messuages in Settle and up to 14 acres of land there from his father. This seems to have been part of the "parsonage lands" rented for 4s annually

George married Janet, their first child recorded in the parish records was Matilda (28th May 1560) followed by Anna (26th May 1564); Margaret (12th Dec 1566); Jane (21st March 1569); Elizabeth (29th July 1571 - 9th July 1572); Thomas (20th Dec 1572); Ellena (25th August 1575); Henry (27th February 1577); William (6th September 1578); George (1st April 1584).

It seems unlikely that his first wife would be able to have children for more than 25 years but it is just possible. There are some records of very young marriages and his wife could have been just 15 or 16 when their first child was born. His eldest surviving son Robert does not appear in the registers but has to have been born prior to early 1559 he shares his grandfather's name and so is probably their first child (unless there had been a daughter) and is certainly their first boy.

When Thomas (his brother) died in 1576 he left two ewes and two lambs to each of George's two sons and asked that if George had not used the saddle he left him before he died, his son Robert should have it. Thomas left sheep to each of George's daughters. The two sons were Robert and Thomas. Henry, William and George junior were born after Thomas's death.

George's daughter Anna married Anthony Brown when she was 14 (11th May 1578)

Matilda married either Thomas Nesfield 24th November 1574 (aged 14, in this case unlikely) or John Proctor on the 5th June 1578 aged 18, which is more likely. There were subsequent marriages between George's grandchildren and the Proctor family.

Jane married Milo Wilson on the 19th June 1589 (aged 20). Robert married Margaret Wilson but we do not have a date for the wedding.

Margaret married William Lund on the 23rd May 1596 aged 30.

Ellena married William Iveson in 1609 aged 34


In 1570 George Somerscales and Robert his eleven year old son bought the manor of Little Newton and 12 messuages and 4 cottages with lands there from Henry Tempest esq and Isabel his wife (YASRS vol. 2 Feet of Fines for the Tudor Period vol 1 1887 p381)


This was Robert's inheritance and consisted of the lordship and manor of Little Newton, 12 messuages, 4 cottages, 15 tofts, 15 gardens, 15 orchards, 300 acres of land, 150 acres of meadow, 200 acres of pasture, 20 acres of wood, 500 acres of heath and furze, 50 acres of moorland and 200 acres of turbary; all 1420 acres held from the earl of Cumberland.

George's sons (Robert's brothers) Thomas, Henry, William and George have proved difficult to pin down, only William and George are mentioned in the will of 1598 and therefore sure to have been alive, but perhaps they are the only two to have married by then (although no record remains) or maybe the other sons were in some way treated as black sheep.

There are no further entries for the Henry born 1577 but he could have remained unmarried in which case there would be no parish record.

Thomas (born 1572) could have married Margaret Maskew at Clapham in 1604, their first son was William, born in 1605 who died very young. The second child was George baptised 22nd June 1606 and Anna the daughter was baptised 14th August 1608. 
SOMERSCALES, George (I17845)
 
4
During May 1623 Thomas's brother-in-law Richard Frankland d
ied leaving Thomas as the guardian of his daughter Margaret. Richard Frankland had married Bridget Somerscales (Thomas's elder sister) who had inherited property at Gargrave including the advowson of Gargrave Church. Their uncle Arthur was the vicar there.

Richard Frankland was the son of Ralph Frankland and brother of William. Richard's grandfather (another William) who died around 1574 was a citizen and cloth worker of London. In 1562 or 1563 Walter Pulleyn assigned the manor of Blubberhouses to William. Walter Pulleyn had received it from his father Ralph who had received it from the Prior of Bridlington in 1535 (one of those grants designed to confuse the dissolution). On the death of William Frankland it passed to Hugh who died in 1606 when it went to William, Richard's brother. The family were intent on building an estate in the area, in 1576 William and Hugh (brothers) bought Ickhorngill, Paceyate and Evening Croft (Maiden Kirk)in Beamsley (between Somerscales and Bolton Bridge) from the Nesfield family and it was quitclaimed by Edward Nesield gent in 1605.

William Frankland bought the manor of Fewston in 1617 from Thomas Pickering and Thomas Coghill (perhaps on behalf of his father because it passed to Richard). They thus owned land from close to the Wharfe, over the Washburn to the eastern boundaries of Fewston which adjoin Harrogate. The Fewston purchase included property called Cragge House, which Richard promised he would sell to William. Richard also received Ickhorngill, Paceyate and Evening Croft (Maiden Kirk)from his father Ralph. He was thus possessed, at least potentially, of a considerable estate.

However, Richard appears to have been physically unwell and was certainly unable to balance his books. William on the other hand was dynamic and vibrant, building-up the family fortunes at Thirkleby Hall and elsewhere. Richard appears to have sold Fewston to his brother. William had paid but had not received the deeds. His patience running short William looked as though he would take possession. In 1622 Richard realised he was very ill and begged his brother not to take The Cragge:

"Most loving brother" he wrote, "both my wife and myself were present at my fathers' when my mother did deliver the surrenders to Mr Pickering for our uses according to our agreement and we all desire that my wife may have her widdowhood at the Cragge" there follows some legal wording the essence of which is that his mother felt she could not sign the surrender while William was absent. Richard continues "can you help me with the £60 that is our bargain, I pray you do it, for that debt which I owe I owe it to many, and my debtors come earnestly upon me because money is so scant in our country and for that £10 which my wife is to have out of it, if you think I will not give it her, I am sure you need not fear it" Richard signs off the letter and then adds a post script "brother I pray you pay £5 to Mr Monks' attorney which I will allow of the £60 which I do owe to one Steve Snell".

Richard's father Ralph also wrote to "his very loving son Mr William Frankland" on the 24th September "this is to let you know that your brother Richard is very sorrowful about the bargain that should be between you and him considering that the lands go [after his death] without any condition at all". Not giving anything after his death for Bridget's widdowhood. He thinks "the strict covenants you have tied him to make him very heavy". He asked him "not to be miscontent" that the bargain did not proceed and for the lapse of time "as for your money, you shall have it honestly paid back".


The family's lawyer Francis Day also wrote "your father, mother, brother and sister are all unwilling that your surrender should proceed because you have not estated your sister in the Cragge for her widdowhood ... they have persuaded your father to pay you your money back.. if you estate the land to their daughter".

Their daughter Margaret had been baptised at Fewston on the 15th April 1613 and William seems to have relented because she was possessed of The Cragge. However, at Richard's death the family did not live there as they were dwelling at Hoyle House in Beamsley, the property of the Clapham family. So William had lost patience with the endebted and indecisive Richard.

On the 1st October 1625 Margaret was aged just twelve (she had been baptised at Fewston on the 15th April 1613)and was with her guardian, her uncle Thomas Somerscales at Gisburn. Her mother Bridget who had returned to her estate in Gargrave had married William Ferrand of Ilkley by licence of 1623.

Despite Margaret's tender years it was agreed in 1625 that she would marry John the son of Richard Banister of Barnoldswick. The following trustees were appointed, Sir William Lister of Thornton knight; Thomas Lacy of Thornton (Thomas Somerscales brother-in-law) and Thomas Heber the younger. Richard Banister's capital messuage in Barnoldswick or Barnoldswick Cotes and the water corn mill with its soke and suit were held for John and Margaret. Clauses assured John and Margaret and their heirs were well provided for with guarantees made for Margaret. However, the trustees were empowered to sell The Cragge before Margaret reached twenty-one if they deemed fit. The couple married at St Mary's Barnoldswick on the 3rd October 1625. 
FRANKLAND, Richard (I17869)
 
5
http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/leitrim/147/macdonald.html [4]

Children > 1. Reginald (Ranald), King of the Isles, Lord of Argyll & Kintyre
> 2. Dugall, of Lorn, Mull and Jura, 1st of Dunollie
> 3. Angus, Lord of Bute and Arran
4. Olaf MacSorley
5. Beatrix, Prioress of Iona, b. Bef 1164
> 6. dau. of Somerled of Argyll

Last Modified 25 Dec 2012 11:32:00
Family ID F3718 Group Sheet

Sources [S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

[S260] Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain 2001, Peter Beauclerk Dewar,, (2001.)

[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, MacDonald01: (Reliability: 3)

[S819] E-mail, From Don Thompson rec: 12 Dec 2012 MacFarlane information from Bruce MacFarlane: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=mygrtgrt & the Andersons from Mabel Manz : http://madcitydon.com/candacraig/mabel_manz.html (Reliability: 3)

[S386] Macdonald genealogy, Roddy Macdonald of the Clan Donald Society of Edinburgh, (http://www.clandonald.org.uk/genealogy.htm), genealogy/d0003/g0000040.html#I0019 (Reliability: 3)

[S684] genus ducere, Joèel Fontaine, (http://users.skynet.be/genusducere//wc_toc.htm) 
Ragnhilda Olafsdtr (I14831)
 
6 Princess of the Picts

Sources [S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p7 (Reliability: 3)

[S386] Macdonald genealogy, Roddy Macdonald of the Clan Donald Society of Edinburgh, (http://www.clandonald.org.uk/genealogy.htm), genealogy/d0006/g0000090.html#I0111 (Reliability: 3) 
Unuisticc (I14842)
 
7 (House of Chiny (de) AV NAMUR, Adelaida (I14559)
 
8 (Kb. 5 F. 159B.) MELLINGEN, Peder Johannesen (I1046)
 
9 (Kb. A3 1770-1805 F. 82B.) OUS, Margrete Jacobsdtr. (I2490)
 
10 a member of the Mercian royal family, and according to the historian Cyril Hart she was a descendant of King Cenwulf of Mercia.[1] Eadburh (I14206)
 
11 Begravet 25 januar 1808 ? Antakelig fra Kirsebom-boken ? KIRSEBOM, Abel Maria (I2568)
 
12 Bruker på mellom-Sandnes 1630-1644, eier halve gården.

Sannsynligvis død 1644.

Se: Lorens Berg: Tjølling s. 426 
Aake (I1914)
 
13 Eastphalian count VON STUBENSKORN, Billung (I14372)
 
14 Etter foreldrenes død vokste han opp hos farbroren, canonicus Ludvig Ludvigsen Munthe i Lund, som straks satte ham i skole i Lund.

23.04.1613 immatrikulert ved København universitet
11.05.1616 baccalaureus philosophiæ
ca. 1616 college (hører) på skolen i Lund, men kun noen få måneder. Juletider 1616 ble han tilbudt å reise utenlands som informator og hovmester for hr. Otto Lindenow (kgl. majestets befalingsmann over Søllesborg i Blekinge) sine to sønner. De reiste i 2 1/2 år og besøkte universitetet i Rostock og dro gjennom Lübeck, Lüneburg, Brunsvig, Cassel, m.m. til Giesen, hvor de hadde ett års opphold, Frankfurt am Main (1618), Leipzig, Jena, Wittenberg. Siden dro han igjen utenlands med en av sine to elever og to av hans brødre. De dro til Cassel, hvor de hadde ett års opphold, Darmstadt (1621), Heidelberg, Speyer, m.m. til Strasburg, hvor de hadde ett års opphold, Basel (1622), Tübingen hvor de hadde 4 måneders opphold, Nørdlingen, Nürnburg, Bamberg, Coburn, Jena, Halle, Magdeburg, Lüneburg og Hamburg.

10.05.1619 magister philosophiæ
1624 sogneprest i Borreby og Løddekjøbing i Lund stift
05.06.1634 utnevnt til kongelig hoffpredikant og flyttet til København.
25.10.1636 kongebrev som biskop i Bergen stift. Han kom ifølge Hofnagel til Bergen 13.03.1637 om ettermiddagen. Det er påstått at grunnen til at han ventet med å reise til Bergen var at byen da var plaget av pest og barnekopper. Men byen var også i 1637 plaget av dette, med 2500 dødsfall p.g.a. disse sykdommene bare i 1637.

Han ble 1639 beordret til Oslo for å innvie byens første kirke, fordi Oslo bispedømme sto ledig. Han hadde en vanskelig reise over Filefjell. 1640 og 1641 utga et par småskrifter. 1644 utga en katekismeforklaring som ble benyttet lenge etter hans død.

Ludvig omtales meget rosende for å røkte sitt kall meget nidkjært og med troskap. Han omtales som en lærd mann med en særpreget gave til å preke slik at hans prekener fikk kraft og virkning.

Han lot Bergen katedralskole gjenoppbygge etter en brann 05.07.1640. Brannen tok også bispeboligen og gjorde biskopen og hans familie husløse.

"Den følgende dag (lørdag 10. mars 1649) var visstnok hans tilstand allerede håpløs, og om ettermiddagen denne dag tok han i forutfølelse av sin nær forestående avgang en høytidelig og hjertelig avskjed med sin hustru og sine mange barn, hvilke han lot falle på kne for seg, la sin hånd på deres hoder og ønsket hver for seg Guds yndest og nåde, formante dem til å frykte Gud og sky synden, så skulle Gud være deres far i hans sted og aldri forlate dem farløse."

Han ble bisatt under koret i Bergen Domkirke. Liktalen over ham ble holdt av sogneprest til Domkirken Engelbrecht Jørgensen.

Han brukte slektsmerket.

Han hadde en sønn og to døtre som døde unge (før 1649).

Skrifter: Anvisning til bønnen for indbyggere i Bergens stift. København 1640. Sandfærdig berætning om nogle sælsomme og underlige fødseler i Bergen stift. København 1641. Guds ords første alphabet, eller den christelige lærdoms hovedstykker i spørsmål forfattede. København 1644.

Se: Norske slektsvåpen Hartvig Munthe: Efterretninger om familien Munthe bd. I s. 70. Worms forfatterlexicon

***

I have spent the evening doing some research into the burial of our common ancestor bishop Ludvig Munthe. He was born 2. August 1593 at Tikjøb Prestegaard at Sjælland, Denmark, christened 12. august, and died 12. March 1649 at 06.15. According to the Bergen history written in the 17th century he was buried in the chancel of Domkirken (the Bergen cathedral). He was the descendant of a very old belgian family, descending from knights known as early as 1072 in the location Munte just south of Ghent.
There is a missing link involving his greatgrandfather and possible his greatgreatgrandfather, but otherwise the connection seem solid, documented through a probate after a known woman in the belgian family, mentioning "her relation" who was the grandfather of bishop Ludvig Munthe.
In the books about the Bergen churches, volume 3, I find some information about Ludvig Munthe. On p. 333 note 6 is mentioned his coffin-plate, preserved at the Bergen historical museum. On p. 325 is mentioned the full latin text of the coffin-plate, with norwegian translation (enclosed). P. 301-302 tell more about it, including a picture of the oval copper coffin-plate, surrounded by a cast-metal frame with cherubs and scrolls in pierced work and crowned with armorial bearings. The book has paralel norwegian and english text.
In volume 2, p. 98- is listed those coffins found in the church in 1870. They were all from the mid- and late 18th century or younger.
This mean you will not be able to find any older burials in the cathedral. The Geelmuyden family grave was to the left of the alter, inside the church.
Ludvig Munthe was buried in the chancel. I am not certain where his coffin was located, but in 1870 coffins were found in a basement between the chancel and the sacristy, other coffins were found in a basement behind the chancel (towards the mountain Fløyfjellet). Others were found on the loft between Domkirken and the sacristy. By this time his coffin seem to be gone.
(email 2005 til dr. Edward J. Neugaard, professor emeritus, University of South Florida, Tampa, Fl. 33620-5550, tlf. (813) 932-3556, email neugaardn@yahoo.com) (Han er etterkommer etter biskop Ludvig Munthe og skal besøke bergen i mai 2005.) 
MUNTHE, Ludvig Hanssøn (I1989)
 
15 Han kan være identisk med broren Halvor f. ca. 1721. Han var bosatt på bnr. 8 under Skjelanger i Meland. LANDSVIK, Halvor Larsen (I10766)
 
16 HYPOTESE: Han er muligens far til Jacob Hansen Agricola ? Se denne. (NB farsnavnet ?) BONDE, Jens (I2260)
 
17 i Masfjorden HAUKSVÆR, Ivar Bendikson (I13594)
 
18 i Masfjorden HAUKSVÆR, Ivar Bendikson (I19700)
 
19 I Mogens Bugge: Schjerven i Lardal, kalles hun Maria Mortensdtr. Schou.

Se: Hagb. Th. Knap: Familien Knap i Norge s. 10-11. 
SCHOTT, Maria Mortensdtr. (I2902)
 
20 In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

Bertrade de Montfort
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search Bertrade de Montfort

Queen consort of the Franks
Tenure 1092–1108

Spouse Fulk IV, Count of Anjou
Philip I of France
Issue
Fulk of Jerusalem
Cecile, Princess of Galilee
House House of Montfort
Father Simon I de Montfort
Mother Agnes, Countess of Evreux
Born c. 1070
Died 14 February 1117 (aged 46–47)
Religion Roman Catholicism


Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070 – 14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux. Her brother was Amaury de Montfort.
Marriages[edit]

First married to Fulk IV, Count of Anjou in 1089 and the mother of his son Fulk of Jerusalem, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier:

The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury de Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty.

Bertrade and Fulk were married, and they became the parents of a son, Fulk, but in 1092 Bertrade left her husband and took up with King Philip I of France. Philip married her on 15 May 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication. Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade. Astonishingly, Bertrade persuaded Philip and Fulk to be friends.
Children[edit]

With Fulk IV, Count of Anjou:
Fulk of Jerusalem, Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem (1089/92–1143)

With Philip I of France:
Philip of France, Count of Mantes (living in 1123)
Fleury of France, Seigneur of Nangis (living in 1118)
Cecile of France (died 1145), married (1) Tancred, Prince of Galilee; married (2) Pons of Tripoli
Later life[edit]

According to Orderic Vitalis, Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis. Orderic also claims she sought to kill Louis first through the arts of sorcery, and then through poison. Whatever the truth of these allegations, Louis succeeded Philip in 1108. Bertrade lived on until 1117; William of Malmesbury says: "Bertrade, still young and beautiful, took the veil at Fontevraud Abbey, always charming to men, pleasing to God, and like an angel." Her son from her first marriage was Fulk V of Anjou who later became King of Jerusalem iure uxoris. The dynasties founded by Fulk's sons ruled for centuries, one of them in England (Plantagenet), the other in Jerusalem.

Bertrade & PhilipFrench royalty
Preceded by
Bertha of Holland Queen consort of the Franks
1092–1108 Succeeded by
Adelaide of Maurienne 
DE MONTFORT, Bertrade (I14465)
 
21 is variously known in contemporary sources as Toda, Tota, Todadomna, Tutadomna, Tutadonna, etc. One twelfth-century source calls her Mayor.[3]

Gonzalo married Ilduara (Ildonza) Peláez, his first cousin, the daughter of his father's brother, Pelayo González, Count of Deza, by the latter's wife, Hermesenda Gutiérrez, sister of Saint Rudesind. She is first mentioned, though not as his wife, in 961. She was dead by 983, for in that year he appears married to a Hermesinda (Ermesenda). She was still living in 1008. All of Gonzalo's six children came by his first wife. 
PELAEZ, Ilduara (Ildonza) (I14600)
 
22 Se videre kopi A4 s. 68- THUNE, Boye Boyesen Wangensteen (I5868)
 
23 Se: S-BT s. 75 BULL, Einar (I4936)
 
24 Se: Bergens historiske forenings skrifter nr. 38, 1932. BERDT, Synnøve Jonsdtr. (I2411)
 
25 Se: Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 174 BÅRDSSØN, Amund (I2304)
 
26 Se: C. W. Ludv. Horn: Mindeblade om dem, fra hvem jeg stammer s. 20. M. Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 176. KRISTJERNSDTR., Lene (I3185)
 
27 Se: Danmarks adels årbok 1948. SUURBECH, Anne (I3292)
 
28 Se: Danmarks adels årbok 1948. Michel (I3302)
 
29 Se: G. J. Høibo: Slekten Falkener - Falch - Falck. FALCH, Mille Melchiorsdtr. (I2594)
 
30 Se: Hagb. Th. Knap: Familien Knap i Norge s. 10-11. BLOM, Karen (I2881)
 
31 Se: Hagb. Th. Knap: Familien Knap i Norge s. 10-11. Kjeld Bugge: Ulrik-slekten Bugge s. 16. SCHJERVEN, Ragna Olufsdtr. (I2909)
 
32 Se: Hartvig Munthe: Familien Munthe. PALUDAN, Elisabeth (I2013)
 
33 Se: Hartvig Munthe: Familien Munthe. Resenii: Inscript. Hafniens s. 107. RONE, Barbara Van Der (I3313)
 
34 Se: Haarstads samlinger, Førde sogn, Bruland. BRULAND, Gjertrud Eilivsdtr. (I2807)
 
35 Se: Haarstads samlinger, Førde sogn; se gårdene Bruland og Kvamme. KVAMME, Erik Trulssen (I2667)
 
36 Se: Jacob Aaland: Nordfjord frå gamle dagar til no. Innvik-Stryn s. 351. RØDBERG, Rasmus Jacobsen Øvre (I2493)
 
37 Se: Lampe: Bergen stifts geistlighet bd. I s. 340 og 430. A. I. Hopstock: Stamtavle over familierne Garmann, Schanche, Krohn og Hopstock s. 1. BUCH, Margrethe Andersdtr. (I3249)
 
38 Se: Lampe: Bergen stifts geistlighet bd. I s. 7 Frimann: Gavebrev s. 105. BUCH, Bodil Andersdtr. (I3255)
 
39 Se: Lampe: Bergen stifts geistlighet I s. 340. A. I. Hopstock: Stamtvale over familierne Garmann, Schanche, Krohn og Hopstock s. 1 SMITH, Kirsten Hansdtr. (I3227)
 
40 Se: Lampe: Bergen stifts geistlighet bd. 1 s. 84. MECKELBORG, Anna Jensdtr. (I3239)
 
41 Se: Lampe: Bergen stifts geistlighet bd. I s. 430. A. I. Hopstock: Stamtavle over familierne Garmann, Schanche, Krohn og Hopstock s. 1. Norsk historisk tidsskrift 2. r. V s. 163f. MADSDTR., Kristine (I3253)
 
42 Se: Lorens Berg: Brunlanes s. 411. RASMUSDTR., Mari (I3279)
 
43 Se: M. Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 176. KLEMMENSEN, Søren (I3190)
 
44 Se: Personalhistorisk tidsskrift 8. r. I s. 178. M. Bugge: Våre forfedre s. 175. C. W. Ludv. Horn: Mindeblade om dem, fra hvem jeg stammer s. 20f. I. Wahl: Slægtebok over afkommet av Christjern Nielsen. CLEMENTSDTR., Kirstine (I3183)
 
45 Se: Sollieds samlinger

Skiftet tyder på at dette ikke er den mad. Thunbo som det ble ringt for i Mariakirken 18.02.1751.
Skifte 5 desember 1749. 
KROGH, Birgitte Catharina Von (I1976)
 
46 Se: Sollieds samlinger NEVERMAN, Karen Tiesdtr. (I2388)
 
47 Se: Stamtavle over familien Angell (Bergen museum, manuskrift 771).

Maria Anna Emahus var datter af oberstløjtnant Hans Jensen Emahus (d. 1717) og Dorothea Heinrichsdatter Bull. Hun blev i 1705 gift med Arnoldus Tønder (ca. 1675 - 26 Aug 1711), som året før havde arvet godset Dønnes efter sin yngre bror Reinholt Tønder, der druknede på den nært beliggende Alstenfjord. Parret nåede kun at få en søn, Hans Emahus Tønder (1710-52). Efter Arnoldus Tønders død i 1711 giftede Maria sig igen med overauditør og krigskommissær Peder Brønlund (1687 - 1738).
Maleriet befinder sig på Rana Museum i Mo. 
EMAHUS, Marie Anna (I2378)
 
48 Se: W. Lassen: Wibe og Lund. RANDULF, Sophie (I2426)
 
49 Seigneur de l'Aigle DE L'AIGLE, Richer (I14729)
 
50 TEORI: Det er mulig at han er identisk med Elling Sjursen Tjore, som var gift med Berete ? Barn: Anders, Nils, antakelig også Guri og Kari (jfr. tingbok 1685). Koppskatten 1645: betalt for seg, kone og en datter på midt-Tjore. Manntall 1647: bruker 1/2 løp 1/2 tønne i midt-Tjore (d.v.s. alt). Kvegskatten 1657: bruker oå midt-Tjore. Jordebok (?) 1661 bruker på midt-Tjore. Manntall 1664: bonde på midt-Tjore. Tingbok 1676 nevnt som vitne i en sak. Tingbok 1696 sak om alarm på tinget, saken også nevnt i 1697. Lagrettemann 1671, 1673, 1675, 1676, 1678, 1679, 1680, 1685, 1686, 1687. SJURSEN, Elling (I2846)
 

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